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back to basics rule question, moving and engagement ranges

Question

Ive not been playing that long and it can sometimes be a while between games. so learning the rules has been a bit of a struggle. But anyway me and my mate have always assumed movement works one way and yet when I played a new opponent he thought is was another way. Consulting the rule book and you can kind of interpret the rules to mean both ways.

Anyway, what I would like to check. lets say you have a model that easily has enough movement to pass between two enemy models and is able to end the movement phase outside of engagement, but during the movement will need to pass through one or both of the enemy model's engagement ranges, is this allowed. or do you need to either end within the engagement range, or make a disengaging  strike? 

and then a similar question for charging, can you charge through one models engagement range and end the charge in another models engagement range but not the one you past though?

 

cheers for any help clearing this up. 

 

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Yes to both. Disengaging strikes are only done when a model starts a walk (speciically the actio named walk, not any other moves) in reach or an enemy :ToS-Melee: attack and declares it will try to end outside itModels with actions that say "move the model up to it's walk" do not let you take disengaging strikes either, only the specific action named walk does. When I say "this model will walk" ia when we measure and you do the strike, not after the model has started moving.

a model that starts engaged cannot declare a charge but if you have a rule that öets you do that the enemy cannot do a disengaging strike because you are not doing a walk. If you are allowed to declare a charge then no model will in any way b able to do a disnegagibg strike, you could move into and out of trn engagement ranges and none if them eill matter. Have you played warmahordes before starting Malifaux? In that game models get free strikes if you move through their engagement for any reason.

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As a note.  There is no double walks.  It’s 2 separate walk actions.  So you can take one single walk action and walk right pass a models engagment.    But if your single walk ends in a models engagement and you walk again, you have to declare that you was leaving engagment and provoke a disengagement strike.    

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cool thanks for clearing that up. glad we have been doing it right. not played warmahordes but the other chap might have looked into it once or twice which might account for the other interpretation. 

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The one thing I HAVE seen that confused another player, is that you can't spend two AP to move double your Walk. For simplicity's sake, you can do that if there's nothing around, but with regards engagements, each Walk action is a separate event, and you need to clear the engagement range with a single Action.

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When you declare the walk action ( so before any movement) you have to say if you're disengaging and your opponent can make a disengaging strike with a :ToS-Melee: attack in range. If that succeeds you don't move. Models that can't reach it before it starts to move can't stop it moving even if it will walk past them. 

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I wondered about this.  I've been playing with the standard table-top idea that once you enter my engagement range, we are engaged sucker!  But, as I understand it from y'all, unless a model begins it's activation engaged, it can move past enemies as long as its' base fits.

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2 hours ago, Talthar said:

I wondered about this.  I've been playing with the standard table-top idea that once you enter my engagement range, we are engaged sucker!  But, as I understand it from y'all, unless a model begins it's activation engaged, it can move past enemies as long as its' base fits.

Once you enter the engagement ranges you are engaged, but that doesn't stop you walking past. 

You can stop someone walking away, but not just walking past. 

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On 6/12/2018 at 10:19 AM, Artiee said:

As a note.  There is no double walks.  It’s 2 separate walk actions.  So you can take one single walk action and walk right pass a models engagment.    But if your single walk ends in a models engagement and you walk again, you have to declare that you was leaving engagment and provoke a disengagement strike.    

Thanks for that clarification.

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On 6/12/2018 at 11:19 AM, Artiee said:

As a note.  There is no double walks.  It’s 2 separate walk actions.  So you can take one single walk action and walk right pass a models engagment.    But if your single walk ends in a models engagement and you walk again, you have to declare that you was leaving engagment and provoke a disengagement strike.    

So does this mean that if you have flight or incorporeal, and don't have enough walk to bypass impassable terrain with the first move, you can't walk twice to reach the other side? I've always played it that way because it simplified things.

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4 minutes ago, spydr261 said:

So does this mean that if you have flight or incorporeal, and don't have enough walk to bypass impassable terrain with the first move, you can't walk twice to reach the other side? I've always played it that way because it simplified things.

You have to end the first walk in a legal spot, ie. not within impassable terrain.

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