Jump to content
spect_spidey

Model Priming Questions

Recommended Posts

With previous miniature games that I played, I would typically prime the miniatures in one of two ways. I would prime them on the sprue using spray primer. Or I would assemble legs and torsos to bases and prime the arms etc, still on sprue using spray primer. Based upon the size of Malifaux minis and how they assemble at odd joints, I am having issues using these two methods. I find some pieces way too small to prime on the sprue and I find that I cannot often times leave arms and such unattached to prime. I am also having difficulty priming them when not attached to the base due to the often times small attachment points like a single foot or tippy-toes. Because of these issues, I have resorted to using a brush and painting the assembled models one at a time by hand. I am finding that this is time consuming and doesn't always give me an even coat. And when I don't have an even coat it can sometimes make it difficult for me to see some details or where different segments begin or end. So I have the following questions for advice. Any tips would be greatly appreciated. I have searched through Google, but I was hoping for some Malifaux specific advice.

1. Do you prime your models using a brush or spray can?

2. Do you prime your models after assembling and if so do you attach them to the base before priming?

3. If you attach to the base prior to priming is it a permanent or temporary attachment?

4. Is there a way to do brush priming quickly and evenly?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I assemble depending on the model and where joints can be hidden. Gap fill with Vallejo putty otherwise. Then I airbrush spray vallejo primer. Vallejo primer can sit evenly if brushed on but it would need to be thinned first. Some items like hats etc I also leave off to paint separately. Also look at the strength of the joint you will need for the model. Some Malifaux models have very tiny joints that will need pinning and/or good plastic glue to keep them from being damaged. If you have paint on the joint plastic glue will not bond.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I assemble all of the miniature. Most of the time I will glue the model on its base too.

For priming I use GW sprays. First black, followed by a mist of white from the top (2 component priming). I like the GW sprays. I tried Army Painter an Vallejo, but GW spray is the most "forgiving". But it still needs some experience.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I prime my models using airbrush, but spray cans mostly times can go well.

For assembly it of course depends of model, it is better to assemble first, but sometimes it hard to paint some areas for specific models, so if connection point is placed in "shadow" area or where different materials meets (boots to legs and so) it possible to glue them after painting. But it's really not recommended to do so on plane monolite areas with skin or cloth.
For base attaching I usualy "pin" my models drilling hole on leg and base and inserting wire so you can disassemble it during work and get solid connection afterwards by gluing pin to both model and base.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I assemble, base and prime my models off the sprue with spray primer.  If they even look at me funny, I pin them to the base and paint the pin black.  I used to prime with Games Workshop primer, but found it too expensive for what it did.  I'll update with the brand I use later.

 

Regarding spray priming: I (try to) spray in temperatures around 70 Fahrenheit/20 Celsius with 70 percent humidity.  I've sprayed in cooler and hotter temps, but I try not to take risks.  The real thing to be careful of is humidity: spraying when it's "hazy, hot and humid" is asking for the mini to get a thin coat of fuzz.  Humidity is a function of the amount of water in the air so don't spray when it's raining.

The best way to spray primer is outside, during a warm, clear day.  Place the minis on a flat surface (I use a cardboard tray I buy with my beverages), spray one side before moving onto the next side then move the tray inside to dry.

 

Hope this helps!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like @Stonewall78 I occasionally leave off a hat or an arm if it is blocking detail but only if will still be possible to join and fill later during the painting process...otherwise I assemble and fill the complete model before priming with an airbrush...am still using Vallejo Surface Primer but am shortly about to try Stynylrez primer...model gets pinned before I prime and stuck into a cork so that it doesn't get handled during painting...and yes some of the models are very delicate so I always like to get the drilling and pinning done beforehand just in case repairs are needed 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use spray primer for mine, GW as much as I hate dropping the money there but I have never really had any problems with their Black primer *White another story*.

As for when I spray them it largely depends on the model.  Many I will fully assemble but not base when I undercoat them but that is because I have a bag full of bases already ready *I use press models and do them, paint and all, in batches for crews so that they are ready in advance*.  If there are pieces that I think will make a model difficult to paint I might assemble the model in pieces or sets and after painting will finish putting it together *my TTB Hannah was that way*.  Largely though what lengths I go depend on the given model, its oddity, and what I am planning to do with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My rule of "assemble/base vs prime" is generally a measure of how easy it will be to fully paint.  If assembling the model fully creates some spots that can't be easily painted, but those spots are hard to see, I'll ignore it and fully assemble.  Conversely, if those spots are very visible I won't fully assemble.

For example, take a look at the Brutal Emissary:

That coffin would be fully assembled and glued to his waste.  It would make painting the robe more annoying, but no one will really focus on the weird folds in/under/around it so I can keep going.

Dude in the cage will *NOT* be fully assembled.  It's highly visible and a focal point of the model.  I'd partially assemble so it's just a few pieces and go from there.

Be careful about it though, I tried to partially assemble Goryo, and their fully painted selves refused to go together so badly I ended up totally destroying one of them.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/31/2017 at 5:30 PM, spect_spidey said:

With previous miniature games that I played, I would typically prime the miniatures in one of two ways. I would prime them on the sprue using spray primer. Or I would assemble legs and torsos to bases and prime the arms etc, still on sprue using spray primer. Based upon the size of Malifaux minis and how they assemble at odd joints, I am having issues using these two methods. I find some pieces way too small to prime on the sprue and I find that I cannot often times leave arms and such unattached to prime. I am also having difficulty priming them when not attached to the base due to the often times small attachment points like a single foot or tippy-toes. Because of these issues, I have resorted to using a brush and painting the assembled models one at a time by hand. I am finding that this is time consuming and doesn't always give me an even coat. And when I don't have an even coat it can sometimes make it difficult for me to see some details or where different segments begin or end. So I have the following questions for advice. Any tips would be greatly appreciated. I have searched through Google, but I was hoping for some Malifaux specific advice.

1. Do you prime your models using a brush or spray can?

2. Do you prime your models after assembling and if so do you attach them to the base before priming?

3. If you attach to the base prior to priming is it a permanent or temporary attachment?

4. Is there a way to do brush priming quickly and evenly?

1. Prefer spray can for speed but sometimes use brush due to temperature, humidity or rain.

2. I prime after assembling and attaching to my painting (non permanent) base.

3. Temporary.

4. Brush will never be as quick as a can. For even coating water the primer down some to get better flow.

Hope this helps!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×