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Airbrushing malifaux?

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Hi all,

Well i am looking for a quick way to paint and have been told numerous times that airbrushing will speed things up?

So my question is, can you airbrush Malifaux? I know you can airbrush warhammer but the examples i have seen in person are a lackluster in detail to say. ie space marines, tanks and tyranids, which an airbrush seems to lend itself to quick well.

Now that Malifaux minis have much more detail and the portions are more realistic, can it be done with relative ease? If so What Airbrush would you recommend i already have a compressor and a cheap AB which i only use to basecoat with.

1) Can you airbrush malifaux mins?

2) What Airbrush would you recommend?

3) Any tips or even examples of what people have done?

Thanks!

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I think that the variety of texture and relative lack of dominant colors would make it kind of a waste to airbrush malifaux minis. Mostly I just use mine for large areas that are the same color, such as power armor and vehicles--wide gradations are what I find airbrushes most useful for.

edit: that molly example is very nice (and way more skillful than I am with an airbrush), but it looks like it was used as a more advanced technique, not for speeding up basic painting.

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29 minutes ago, Terry Bailey Sr said:

Quite handy for undercoating/priming.

My wife got me an airbrush for my birthday and I'm still not doing much actual painting with it but priming with the airbrush is way better than using a rattle can.

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Airbrush is a tool...not a magic wand...yes it can be excellent for smooth blends over an area and if you are prepared to spend a lot of time with very fine masking tape even very small areas can be picked out in spectacular style...

...with either a natural born talent or a lot of practice great results can be achieved with an airbrush....but for the small size and myriad of details in Malifaux sculpts a couple of good number 1 or 0 Winsor & Newton Series 7 brushes will be way cheaper as an outlay and will get you all the detail you want....patience is your friend 

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here's my advice to people who want to use airbrushes;

 

Understand that an airbrush is a tool. it is not a replacement for a regular paint brush. just like you wouldn't use a base brush or dry brush to paint an entire miniature, do not think you can paint an entire miniature with an airbrush and expect it to look good; handled well, you can and will get some amazing, AMAZING effects with an airbrush. but airbrushed only minis always look awful IMO.

 

 

that said; get a dual-action, gravity feed airbrush and an air compressor with both a pressure gauge and a pressure regulator valve-thingie..I'm not sure the technical term. with miniature painting you want a lot of control of the air pressure, nd you generally want a lower air pressure. that set up will give you the best result.

 

 

edit: wow..aaand i just noticed how old this post is...

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33 minutes ago, Kyris said:

... just like you wouldn't use a base brush or dry brush to paint an entire miniature ...

Hang on, are you saying that I should be using more than one brush?  

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Sure you can - for the right mini.

Airbrushes make priming and basecoating a total breeze, and then you can do something called zenithal highlighting, which I'm still learning, but works very well for anything that's mostly one colour (see the Terror Tot below, for instance). One trick when zenithal highlighting is to use slightly different colours to increase contrast. So for instance, when spraying that Tot, I basecoated in bright pink, but I didn't use dark pink for the shadow coat. What I did was to mix the pink with a little blue, to create more of a purple. I think this is called colour temperature highlighting / lowlighting or something like that. I learned it at an airbrush session I took with a Golden Daemon-level painter.

Even with stuff that's multicoloured (character model-type stuff), an airbrush can be useful. I like to prime, then spray many models in a fleshtone for instance, so that the skin areas are nice and flat, and I know they extend to the very edge of the hairline, etc. Makes painting eyes a bit easier when the paint underneath is perfectly smooth.

Airbrush wise, I use an Iwata HP-CS, which is a great, if slightly expensive choice. You'll also want a compressor with a number of features, including:
-An air tank (to avoid pulsations).
-An adjustable regulator (to allow you to spray at different pressures).
-A moisture trap (so your paint doesn't get contaminated).
I use a Badger compressor, but I think it's a rebranded Chinese item which is widely available.

Initial setup costs are not cheap, but this will save you time and money in the long run if you use a lot of rattle cans currently. The Iwata brush I mention will probably get handed down to grandkids too if I ever procreate. It's a real quality piece of kit.

Anyway, here's one of my Terror Tots, which was actually the first Malifaux mini I painted. I've been doing Warhammer stuff on and off since I was a kid. This was probably 80% airbrushed (all the skin), with just the details painted by hand. I also sprayed the base black using an airbrush, and then painted the other tiles in bone:


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