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Painting skin


Er1k
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~Hi Folks

The wifes away for a couple of days and I'm looking forward to getting my paints out and starting to paint my Convict Gunslinger. I'm not very good at painting flesh and was hoping someone could give me some hints ant tipe. I'll be using GW paints and Ive already sprayed the model white and given it a badab black wash to create the deepest shades. Any hints and tips you guys could offer would be great

Thanks in advance

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Hi I use gw paints.I do my skin tones with a dwarf flesh base coat.light wash with ogryn flesh wash.back to dwarf leaving the wash in the resesses and highlight with elf flesh.little bits at a time.and maybe a final highlight with a tip of bleached bone mixed in but used very sparingly.you can see my gallery for how it comes out. :)

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There is a tutorial Automaton did a while ago which is pretty useful and in depth:

http://www.coolminiornot.com/articles/1757-urmuth-painting-flesh-and-using-colour

On thing I try to do is the base colour with 2 shades and one or two highlights. The thing I always do on flesh which was suggested by the article was a few glazes of colour in the flesh to change the focus and also make it a bit more interesting. When I did my Neverborn crew, the flesh had a slight tinge of Scab red in it, and around the eyes there was some Hawk Turquoise to change them a bit.

It depends how far you want to go with the model to how far closely you follow the article, but I've found picking a few points from it on what you want to focus on does OK for basic models, and you can take more and more to add a greater level of details for the model.

Hope it helps.

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I would only add that you want to make sure you water your paints down a bit. It will make it easier to make the flesh look smooth, and not pasty. I decide how dark I want the flesh then test it on a palette first. I also always start with a black primer, then a base coat of GW foundation paint Tallarn flesh. From there it is just your personal preference.

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Imprinted my convict with redneck attitude in mind. For his redneck flesh I used Vallejo EQ to bronzed flesh and did a red wash over the brown one (I fer'git their names dur). Then for his "shirt tan" I uses the same flesh and just added white for highlights with no wash. The scars are a bit or purple mixed with rotting flesh and bronzed flesh and I forgot how I painted his perky nipples because it was a traumatizing experience so someone else will have to help you there.

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Like the other posters, I start with a mid tone flesh, ogryn wash, base color, and then add a lighter skin tone, followed by adding white to the lighter skin tone

when you get to the scars, try using watered down baal red or blue wash(or both) and build up the layers slowly.

skin was a total mystery to me until ogryn wash.

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There is a tutorial Automaton did a while ago which is pretty useful and in depth:

http://www.coolminiornot.com/articles/1757-urmuth-painting-flesh-and-using-colour

On thing I try to do is the base colour with 2 shades and one or two highlights. The thing I always do on flesh which was suggested by the article was a few glazes of colour in the flesh to change the focus and also make it a bit more interesting. When I did my Neverborn crew, the flesh had a slight tinge of Scab red in it, and around the eyes there was some Hawk Turquoise to change them a bit.

It depends how far you want to go with the model to how far closely you follow the article, but I've found picking a few points from it on what you want to focus on does OK for basic models, and you can take more and more to add a greater level of details for the model.

Hope it helps.

+1 here.

However, if you are simply beginning and wish to get the basics down.

base Dwarf flesh.

Shade Tallarn Flesh

Highlight Elf Flesh.

The rest is down to blending and adding in anything you find particularly interesting.

Eg. Tattoos. Pink scar tissue. Veins.

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Aside from what has already been mentioned...I would say that from your pictures it looks like your paints aren't thin enough. I would suggest adding a few things to your paints before application. I would get some flow improver, Matte Medium, and finally Gloss Medium. You can get them in most craft stores that sell paints. A good brand is Windsor and Newton. A bottle of each will last you a long time and will set you back about $25.00 (for the set). I would recommend adding about 6 drops of the flow improver, 3 each of the gloss and matte mediums (this will give you a satin finish). Drop it right into the pot and shake the hell out of it. Your paints will be thin (all the way to translucency) without becoming chalky (unlike just using water to thin).

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