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Lure and Bring It


Urlock Gaur
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Probably a dumb question but who controls the movement of a model that has been targeted by”Lure” or “Bring It”?   New rules on “towards” now make it not something that either player could do and come up with the same result.  Thank you. 

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9 hours ago, Maniacal_cackle said:

Oh gross. I just read those abilities in the app and you're right.

Lure: move the target (so the attacker gets to move the target).

Bring it: target moves (so the target gets to move the target).

In thre Friendly, Enemy, & Control section of the rules:
 

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Certain Actions and Abilities allow a player to control a model in an enemy’s Crew. When this happens, the controlling player makes all decisions for the model, including flipping cards, Cheating Fate, declaring Actions, and so on.

Example: A model has an Action that reads “Target Pushes 3" toward the nearest other enemy model.” It successfully uses this Action on the opponent’s model, so when resolving, the opponent’s model Pushes 3" toward the nearest other model controlled by that opponent.

Since the example for "enemies controlling movement" uses "targets pushes", I think the acting model is controlling Bring It.

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2 minutes ago, fire5tone said:

The person who takes the action, same with most moves and pushes (so the person that performed the lure)

That’s kind of what I thought but the model doing the action doesn’t also control the attack.  It’s not an Obey where it assumes control.  Before “towards” was changed then it had to move directly towards the center point of the model.  Now that’s not true.  It’s just an odd thing now.  Although I guess if they wanted the opponent to move it then it would say, “Opponent must …”.   Thanks for the response.  Much appreciated. 

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For lure its certainly the attacking model. For being it, which us worded differently I think it might be the target that controls the move. 

 

EDIT - Alcathous has actually read the rules. Since the example used in the rules of Enemy controlled is the same wording as Bring it, then I think its safe to assume Bring it is controlled by the attacking model

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2 hours ago, Adran said:

For lure its certainly the attacking model. For being it, which us worded differently I think it might be the target that controls the move. 

Oh gross. I just read those abilities in the app and you're right.

Lure: move the target (so the attacker gets to move the target).

Bring it: target moves (so the target gets to move the target).

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Eh, Bring It's always been a "Do you feel lucky, punk?" type attack anyway.  "Target moves its Mv +2" towards this model" is specifying a move controlled by the target's controller (its owner).

It's the same difference expressed in things like Chain Gang:

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Move the target up to 3".  Then, this model may move up to 3", which must end within 3" of the target."

(the model performing the action controls both) or the difference between "push ____" (the person resolving the effect chooses) and "______ pushes" (whoever has control of _____ chooses) when there are options left unspecified.

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On 5/22/2021 at 1:14 PM, Alcathous said:

In thre Friendly, Enemy, & Control section of the rules:
 

Since the example for "enemies controlling movement" uses "targets pushes", I think the acting model is controlling Bring It.

Does this mean the attack is also controlled by the attacker

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15 minutes ago, Mycellanious said:

Does this mean the attack is also controlled by the attacker

No I don't think it does. 

I think that the default is the attack controls things done during its action resolution, but if it creates a new action then the control will revert to the defending model for that action unless otherwise stated. ( And this doesn't contradict FAQ question 1 as that refers to controlling actions generating new actions). 

 

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On 5/22/2021 at 7:14 PM, Alcathous said:

Since the example for "enemies controlling movement" uses "targets pushes", I think the acting model is controlling Bring It.

Would that suggest, that with the e.g. "Drop It" trigger ("target must drop an enemy scheme marker") acting model decides the position of the scheme marker not the target? (Sorry to hijack the thread with a different ability.)

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On 5/22/2021 at 12:14 PM, Alcathous said:

In thre Friendly, Enemy, & Control section of the rules:
 

Since the example for "enemies controlling movement" uses "targets pushes", I think the acting model is controlling Bring It.

You've managed to read the example incorrectly.

Try again, keeping in mind that the section is on the meaning of enemy and friend:

Quote

Certain Actions and Abilities allow a player to control a model in an enemy’s Crew. When this happens, the controlling player makes all decisions for the model, including flipping cards, Cheating Fate, declaring Actions, and so on.

Example: A model has an Action that reads “Target Pushes 3" toward the nearest other enemy model.” It successfully uses this Action on the opponent’s model, so when resolving, the opponent’s model Pushes 3" toward the nearest other model controlled by that opponent.

The sentence

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“Target Pushes 3" toward the nearest other enemy model.

becomes

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“Target Pushes 3" toward the nearest other other model [controlled by that opponent] (enemy).

It is NOT saying anything about who is dictating the choices in the push.

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1 hour ago, malyzubor said:

Would that suggest, that with the e.g. "Drop It" trigger ("target must drop an enemy scheme marker") acting model decides the position of the scheme marker not the target? (Sorry to hijack the thread with a different ability.)

That's part of how you know the conclusion is wrong.  :)  The acting model does not dictate where the marker is placed for Drop It, the target does.

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