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Ein Silverkin

How to create a community in a city without one?

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I just moved to Ottawa, Ontario and as far as I am aware there is no Malifaux community. I played the game for a while in 1st edition, but I REALLY want to go back to it in a big way now that I am living in a larger city, but it seems the game was played for a while here and then dropped when 2nd edition came out. How would I go about starting a new community?

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Just a few general thoughts, since I don't know the area:

You mentioned there are experienced players around.  I would see if any players are interested in restarting.

Then, find a friendly local game shop and offer to run demos during open-table days.  Hopefully you have two crews to use in the demos.

A huge part of building a community is getting the word out - be at the flgs to talk up the game or advertising set game times on Facebook and/or Meetup.

 

good luck and be patient, it can take a little time.

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I would add playing games to the above recommendation of "getting the word out." When potential or returning players see games played (preferably with fully painted crews on engaging tables) they are more likely to "buy into" or join a new community.

Getting the local game store on board is a huge part of the effort as well. What I mean by that is getting them to carry a good product range, not just a handful of unrelated items and a willingness to special order things. A few methods of doing this, though I would argue the best is to show them the potential of the game by holding a private demo for them. It Also helps to mention that events are low maintenance for the store, i.e. provide space and terrain items only. Mention the prize packs and the promotional opportunities particularly the mail in ones that require brick and mortar receipts.

Early on it can be extremely discouraging however if you keep at it, eventually the community will begin to sustain it self. I would recommend  2 demos per month for the first few months and then offer an extremely casual league event (be sure to advertise it as such since you have experienced players). After the league, gauge the response and schedule either another league (be sure to provide a break so players can pursue other interests), and achievement event,  or a more competitive tournament.

Expect it to take at least 6 months to build a community of dependable regulars.

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I was in the same boat. I just  told some guys at work about my hobby now and then and after a while asked them if they'd like to try. My wife asked a guy at her work if he'd like to play Malifaux with me, he Googled it and agreed  now he and I are great friends.   We played with my models at my house,  they bought their own stuff.  We went to the local game store to play with painted crews and some people asked about it so I taught them. I left some fairly nice looking terrain at the shop for people to use as they wished.  Then I disappeared for a while due to life stuff. Recently I just made a poster advertising an enforcer brawl and handed it to the store owner. Rules on a QR code. 6 players in total showed up, another random guy was watching so I got him joined in, he then bought a crew box,  and the store owner wants to organise another brawl so he can play in it. Enforcer brawl is a great way to learn but it needs about 4 or 5 people. 

Is not exactly a big scene and all this took like 2 years, I don't have much time so it's moved very slowly,  but The key was just asking those guys  in work and getting that first someone to play against. Be prepared for knock backs too, if ain't for everyone. I'm surprised how many folk said yes. 3! It was pretty easy . 

Its an hour drive to the game store,  which  is tricky on a work night, kids, etc. But being at the store is important. Folk need to know that they will have someone to play against if they invest in the game. 

I've heard of people just giving someone else a crew and start from there. 

Is not easy, it's actually work being 'the Malifaux guy' in your area trying to grow a scene. But once u get of the ground of gets a lot easier. 

 

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Another thing to remember is that game stores like business. Many stores with the space already run board game night or card game night. They do this to bring people in, even though it can be a lot of work for them. If you offer to do most of the leg work, many would be happy to mention your demo night to new people who come in.

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