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Found 3 results

  1. I know this was a topic of discussion way back, but I figured it's worth bringing up again now that more and more people have experience with the system: What is your preferred method for dealing with consciousness tests for nonplayer characters? Rules as written an NPC will either always pass or always fail. Always passing makes for a grueling boss fight (which I actually like), but it also means you need the right stats and/or rank for the NPC to not just conk out at 0. As is recommended in the book I've just been having minor/non-characters die or whatever at 0 wounds. What about the rest of you?
  2. I'm hoping there will be rules for horses at some point, but until then I've whipped up some very generic stats for horses in Through the Breach. Any feedback would be welcome, as I have little personal experience with horses (though I have ridden one!) and have created these stats based largely on the Malifaux characters who ride horses. These stats assume the horse has not been trained for a special role or environment, like combat. I was also thinking that anyone shooting at a rider on a horse would randomize hits between the horse and rider, as if firing into melee. Anyone who can call shots can choose between horse and rider. There's a new General Talent to go along with this: Trick Riding Prerequisite: Husbandry Rank 3 or higher The character is lithe and agile in the saddle, capable of doing things most people wouldn't dream of attempting. Trick Actions taken while in the saddle gain when resolving. The character does not suffer from the Unstable Platform penalty when attacking on from horseback. The Fatemaster may also allow the character to attempt other acrobatic feats from the saddle, or while mounting or dismounting the horse (e.g., jumping into the saddle from a second-story window, mounting a riderless horse as it gallops by, hanging off the horse to pick up something on the ground, etc.) Riding Horse This represents a wide variety of breeds trained to bear a saddle and rider. Physical Might 4 Grace 2 Speed 4 Resistance 3 Mental Charm -3 Int -4 Cunning 0 Tenacity 1 Calculated Df 6 Wp 3 Walk 6 Charge 10 Height 2 (3 with rider) Wounds 6 Skills Notice 1 Pugilism 2 Talents Shove Aside: See The Fated Almanac, p137. Treat the horse as Height 3 if it has a rider. Attacks (1) Nasty Kick: AV 6, Range :melee2, Resistance: Df, Target takes 2/3/5 damage Tail Over Teakettle: The character is pushed 2 yards directly away from the horse and is considered prone. ​​ Draft Horse This represents a wide variety of breeds trained to work in a harness and pull a load. These breeds are typically larger and more heavily muscled than "riding" horses. Physical Might 5 Grace 2 Speed 3 Resistance 3 Mental Charm -3 Int -4 Cunning 0 Tenacity 1 Calculated Df 5 Wp 3 Walk 7 Charge 9 Height 2 (3 with rider) Wounds 8 Skills Notice 1 Pugilism 2 Toughness 1 Talents Beast of Burden: If put in a yoke with at least one other horse with this Talent, any duel involving the team gains when resolving. Shove Aside: See The Fated Almanac, p137. Treat the horse as Height 3 if it has a rider. Attacks (1) Nasty Kick: AV 7, Range :melee2, Resistance: Df, Target takes 2/3/5 damage Tail Over Teakettle: The character is pushed 2 yards directly away from the horse and is considered prone.
  3. Hey all, one thing that I'm sure many of you have noted is that our Fated have an infuriating capacity to kick out extremely high volumes of damage on a focused target. This can make it challenging to craft a good combat, as has been noted several places. I took a note from one of my other favorite RPG's and worked out a similar concept for TTB, which should help allow for fights that are more objective centric. Mobs of Things The idea of Mobs is that there are piles of a thing that would be irritating on its own, but perhaps not outright dangerous. However, in a seething mass, they are significantly more concerning. A Mob has four fundamental stats. Movement, Wounds (how many hits it can take before it dies. No crits here), Defense (TN to hit), and Attack (TN to Dodge). A Mob takes up an area of space, and can engage anything that it touches. It has a single move action, and then automatically hits anything it is touching. It is relatively mindless (yes, even a horde of villagers), and as a result is not affected at all by anything that requires sentience. Anything that defends on Wp, but would affect a mindless thing uses its Df value instead. Dealing damage to a Mob: Mobs take damage differently than normal creatures. They are a mass of things together, so it is more about how well you hit, rather than how hard. A Mob of Things will take 1 Wound for each successful attack, and an additional wound for every full margin of success that an attack succeeds by. Succeed by 6? That's 2 wounds, kids. Taking Damage from a Mob: Mobs automatically attack anything they are touching. They will deal 1 point of damage, plus one for every margin of failure on the Defense flip that cannot be reduced. Mobs will suffer 1 additional wound for every blast marker an attack inflicts upon them. As a generality, Defense and Attack TN can be pretty well similar (9-12 are good values) and should be related to how nasty the things are in general. 7 for rats, 13 for villagers for example. Wounds should be a multiple of this number, and related to the size of the mob. I like these for encounters where you are looking to apply pressure to a task which has to occur WHILE you are fighting, and to help mitigate those particularly nasty min/max combat characters and allow your less combat oriented to shine a bit.
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